Category Archives: Healthcare

Abusing Language

Usually it’s liberals who abuse language in the best Orwellian tradition, but evidently not wanting to be left behind, conservatives have now joined the party. In an article at the National Review Online, John Fund discusses a provision in the Obamacare … Continue reading

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Obamacare Alternative

In two separate posts (here and here) at the blog The Incidental Economist, Aaron Carroll, a determined advocate for centrally directed healthcare, is upset and frustrated with the critics of Obamacare and suggests they propose some “sensible alternatives that actually address the policy issues.” Well, … Continue reading

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Healthcare Pricing

A recent post at the blog Project Millennial outlines some of the issues relating to health-care as understood by liberals. According to the post, healthcare prices are a “total mess” because “list prices” vary immensely from provider to provider and the price … Continue reading

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Organizing Healthcare

The important question for healthcare, as is true for the economy as a whole, is how to organize and regulate healthcare. Generally, we can organize around competitive markets or through a system directed by a central authority. History proves that competition is the superior choice, … Continue reading

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The Mind Of Aaron Carroll

My experience after submitting a comment to a post on the liberal blog The Incidental Economist nicely illustrates the working of the liberal mind these days. The blog, which is well regarded within the media, claims to contemplate “healthcare with a focus on re-search,” and because it’s “evidence-based,” … Continue reading

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Ignoring The Blue Whale In The Room

One of the unassailable facts of social life is that centrally directed economies never out-perform economies that organize collective activity through competitive markets. The “natural experiments” of the last century, some of which continue today (e.g., see the experiment on the Korean peninsula), easily prove the superiority … Continue reading

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The Determined Statist akaThe Incidental Economist

The authors of the blog The Incidental Economist are thinking of changing its name and are asking readers for suggestions (mine is given below). Evidently, the primary authors have no formal economic training and so the name doesn’t “convey” what they do, … Continue reading

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Debating Wing Nuts

So liberals like Cass Sunstein of Harvard Law School think they have a way to humble  “wing nuts.” Wing nuts are people who, from the liberal perspective, disagree with the liberal “vision” of massive government. As he considers how to debate wing nuts, Sunstein finds a … Continue reading

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Catastrophic Care – Part Two

The previous post reviewed some of the problems about healthcare in America as iden-tified by David Goldhill in his recent book “Catastrophic Care.” So how does Goldhill pro-pose to fix healthcare and contain costs? First, he would require everyone to purchase health insurance, but … Continue reading

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Catastrophic Care – Part One

In his recent book “Catastrophic Care,” David Goldhill argues that the central problem with America’s healthcare system is the use of insurance to finance healthcare expen-ditures. According to Goldhill, insurance-based healthcare cannot control costs because consumers (i.e., patients) don’t directly pay for … Continue reading

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